Silence: Martin Scorcese and the jesuits

The YVY series is based on the Jesuit missions in the Southern of America. For this reason, the work of research for his production bent a little on the history of those who were considered the soldiers of Christ, the Jesuits of the Cia de Jesus. That is why, it is necessary to quote the film Silêncio, of the director Martin Scorcese, like one of the materials researched.

I had already learned of the adventure and martyrdom of the Jesuit priests in distant Japan when he read the book Viagem às Missões Jesuíticas e Trabalhos Apostólicos, another reference used in the YVY series. So the film caught my eye when it was released in Brazil in 2017. This is not the most acclaimed film of the famous director, but has the merit of raising strong questions about faith and religion and, especially, about the importance, or not, to take this work of converting others to their religion.

In it, we are horrified at the brutality with which the seventeenth-century Japanese shogunate treated those who tried to bring foreign influence to their lands. The protagonist of the film, the Portuguese priest Sebastião Rodrigues, played by Andrew Garfield, finds himself experiencing the same difficulties that the clandestine primitive Christians spent during much of the Roman empire, having to flee and hide, facing various tortures and martyrdoms. The silence, in this case the title of the film, may relate to how Japanese Christians should live to escape persecution. In silence. But silence will manifest itself in the film in many ways, the viewer who makes his assessment.

It is well to remember that violence in the name of religion was also widely practiced by Christians, not only in the Middle Ages or in the Crusades. The Holy Inquisition says so.

Anyway, the history of the Jesuits in Japan ended up inspiring a character in the YVY series, you will meet him in the third episode, in production stage. Wait!

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